April 23, 2013

The Bare Wall Dilemma

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When the custom Dream On quilt and shams are completed, I plan to work on a queen-sized quilt for my living room wall.  The wall is huge and very bare without a quilt.  Many people who come over ask what happened to the quilt!

Bare living room wall

Since there is a moratorium on buying fabric at my house {with special exceptions such as fabric that perfectly matches a friend's nursery!}, I plan to use Annie's Farm Stand, the collection I bought last February ... 2012, that is.  I will use the Starlit Evening pattern by Anka's Treasures as shown in the picture below.  I so love her patterns and excellently-written directions!  I actually have this fabric collection in my stash and began this exact quilt for my living room wall, but after I got the blocks made, I decided it was too much of a winter collection to put it up now, so I set it aside to be worked on again in the fall ... of 2013 is the plan!!
Starlit Evening
I made Mrs.Star for this wall and hung her there for a few months, but I took her down to photograph a custom queen-sized Barn Raising Quilt on the quilt rack and didn't put Mrs.Star back up since she wasn't really liked by the Mister.  I'm not sure that anything made with Annie's Farm Stand will be 100% approved by the Mister because the fabric is so bright and loud and fun and a huge change from the muted primitive colors of the Thimbleberries quilt that hung there for seven years, but I am done with primitive fabrics!

ETA:  A commenter asked about the quilt rack shown in the first picture.  The wooden quilt rack uses pressure to hold the quilt.  It is two long pieces of wood sandwiched together and held by the six wooden knobs along its length.  The back piece of pine attaches to the wall with three screws.  The screws are installed in the wall, and the back wood piece hangs from them, which makes the entire quilt rack removable.  It is much easier to put the quilt on the rack and then hang it rather than attach a heavy queen quilt to it while hanging.  The knobs loosen to allow a quilt to slip into the bottom section, and when the knobs are tightened, the pressure holds the quilt in place.  It's a great way to not harm the quilt and not require a hanging pocket.  

I purchased this quilt rack seven years ago from http://www.gwizpro.com/qww/, a veteran-owned company.  They are still in business.  You can totally customize the quilt rack as to the type of wood, stain/paint color, and exact length.

3 comments :

jeifner said...

The Mrs Star is so beautiful! But I understand, in Spanish there is a saying about this, "There's nothing written about (individual) taste." Your quilts are so wonderful I'm sure you'll find something he likes :)

Sheila said...

I understand how you feel. I love color.
How did you hang your quilt from the wooden piece on the wall?

Mrs.Hearts said...

@ Sheila,
The wooden quilt rack uses pressure to hold the quilt. It is two long pieces of pine sandwiched together and held by the six wooden knobs along its length. The back piece of pine attaches to the wall with three screws. These knobs loosen to allow a quilt to slip into the bottom section, and when the knobs are tightened, the pressure holds the quilt in place. It's a great way to not harm the quilt and not require a hanging pocket. I purchased this quilt rack seven years ago from http://www.gwizpro.com/qww/, a veteran-owned company. They are still in business.
Mrs.Hearts