June 26, 2015

Custom Quilting for Joyce

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A few months ago in the checkout line at JoAnn's, there was a lady in front of me who was holding a huge roll of batting, and I offered her the end of my cart to give her arms a break.  I was intrigued to see someone buying batting in huge rolls like I do, so I did my usual and began talking to her.  We waited a long time in line, chatting away, and our conversation eventually came around to the fact that I have a long-arm quilting machine.  We shared where we live, and what?  She lives on the same road as my father-in-law?!  I told her his name, and bingo - it turns out she has known my in-laws for many, many years through their church, and her husband even golfs occasionally with my FIL!


This quilting project is the result of that conversation in JoAnn's checkout line.  This is the second time ever that I've quilted someone else's quilt top.  {The first is here.}  It's a queen size and is a wedding gift for her son.


Was I nervous?  Yes and no.  I have quilted with Mrs.Singer for almost five years, so I'm very confident in how she and I work together.  My biggest worry was running out of batting or backing before the quilting was complete, and I measured everything very carefully to be sure there was enough before I began ... and then I caught myself attaching the long side of the batting to the shorter side of the backing - which would have created exactly what I was afraid of!

I now realize there are many things that can go wrong for a quilter quilting other's work, some of which the quilter has no control over, and it is risky.  The quilter can be blamed when the quilt doesn't lie flat when it didn't lie flat before it was quilted.  Same thing with square corners, puckers in the quilt top, strings that should have been removed by the quilter showing through, etc.  Both of us are putting our trust in each other.  She's trusting me with her imperfect work, and I'm trusting her to not expect perfect quilting.  It's a delicate balance.  I am tickled that all went well!

I'm so glad I watched Angela Walters' video before I quilted this quilt!  Even if you don't long-arm quilt, this video is well worth a watch.


If the video does not appear above, you can see it here:  https://youtu.be/jGyYSJhk0Q.

Please contact me if you are looking for a basic quilter.  I have very reasonable rates because I do not have an expensive machine to pay for, and the only stitch available is an allover meandering stitch in small, medium, and large.  The stitch shown is considered medium.

Linking to:
:: Off the Wall Friday :: WIPs Be Gone :: TGIFF :: Can I Get A Whoop Whoop?! :: Link a Finish Friday :: Fabric Frenzy Friday :: Creative Goodness :: Crazy Mom Quilts :: What I Did This Week :: Pet Project Show :: Show Off Saturday :: MOP Mondays :: Quilt Story :: Too Cute Tuesday :: Show and Tell Tuesday :: Linky Tuesday ::

7 comments :

Shannon said...

Thanks for the video! This is true for every aspect of our life. Speak life, not death over ourselves and we will be blessed!

Jasmine said...

You did a beautiful job on her quilt. And I agree that it is stressful yet rewarding to work on someone else's quilt. :)

Tawa said...

Well done for taking a chance, and taking on her quilt. Its funny how often those chance conversations lead to new opportunities.

AlidaP said...

Your work is wonderful and your words very inspiring! Thanks also for sharing the video, great message!!

katyquilts said...

It looks fabulous! I agree, it can be really scary quilting someone elses quilt. I quilt for Quilts of Valor and have done a few for pay but it is scary! Those darn expectations! This turned out very nicely.

Sew Stitching Cute said...

I love the stippling on this and the 1st quilt you quilted for someone else! Stipple is just a good 'go-to' quilt pattern. I really love your thoughts regarding accepting not the perfect quilting and not blaming the quilter necessarily for any imperfections BEFORE it was quilted. I think some people aren't really true to themselves with any imperfections while others are extreme opposite and think it isn't that great and it is actually returned not in such great shape. I have heard all sorts of stories and I believe there will always be those types of stories... quilters are human so human things will always happen. I think if everyone took a piece of your thoughts on it, it might just help more! Thank you for linking up and stopping over at WIDTW! Have a happy 4th of July!

Adrienne said...

Your quilting is fabulous! Good for you for putting yourself out there and getting the experience under your belt. Sometimes that it the hardest part! Thank you for lynking up with me for TIGFF!